Scapegoat

Working up to the Q Carpark Chinese New year group show I had just dived headlong into the work of Lucebert and Henri Michaux. Both were poets and painters. Both worked in the gap between art and life, tinkering with the settings of consensus reality that is defined by the limits of language and more specifically written language. I was interested in how returning to their methodoligies could help engage with Derrida’s ideas of the trace and the disjunct from thought in its most elemental form. The restrictions of the venue mean that wall hanging is far from easy and also looks pretty feeble in such an industrial space. The lattice work of pipes and wiring make it more suited to hanging within the space. So with  recto and verso in mind I hung the canvases in space defining clusters that could be viewed from back or front. A sort of absurdist Shoji. Knowledge (written word) in the enlightened consensus fashion sits on the surface of the page so this exhibition was a chance to disrupt that. To interfere with the presumption that written word is medium for reason. The canvases combine words and pictures scribed and daubed. The biggest break through was realising that marks that look like words but aren’t (asemic poetry) could add to the ryhthm and meaning. The title scapegoat refers in part to the new year but also to Derrida’s description of the status of written word as corruption of spoken word (atleast that is the paradigm we have culturally). The paradox is that as enlightened rationalists defined by written language we have an “inability to think how philosophy itself is determined by something that escapes it.” The works I made are an attempt to somehow hack into the paradigm and open a portal between reason and the creative well spring.

and here is a guided tour with the live dripping pipe audio sound. One day I may use this as a stand alone audio work. Drip drip drip drop

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